Skip to Content
Weekend
Edition

Best of the news
from abroad
Every
Saturday

Arriving at
6:00 AM

March 21 2020
Back to the issue

Eat

Anges du Sucre


Not all cakes are created equal. Londoner Reshmi Bennett was trained in classical French cuisine in Paris at the École Grégoire-Ferrandi—one of the country’s leading culinary schools—before working under a string of Parisian, Michelin-starred chefs. Bennett moved back to London in 2011 and started Anges de Sucre, making and delivering exquisite hand-decorated cakes. The definition of decadence, her version of a traditional croquembouche—a French dessert consisting of choux-pastry puffs piled into a cone and covered in caramel threads—is made from chocolate and vanilla sponge cake and studded with doughnuts, eclairs, macarons, and more. It reaches more than three feet in height and takes at least two days to make. (angesdesucre.com) —Bridget Arsenault

Listen

Americast


A stalwart of news in the U.K., BBC journalist Emily Maitlis stamped herself onto the minds of the general population with her explosive Newsnight interview with Prince Andrew. Alongside her longtime friend Jon Sopel—himself a veteran reporter and the current North America editor for the BBC—she hosts Americast, a podcast recorded from the U.S. campaign trail. Maitlis calls a “cock-up” when she sees one, and together they bring a welcomed new perspective to an otherwise tired affair. (bcc.co.uk) —Bridget Arsenault

Look

Hand Mirror


Inspired by a Bauhaus dresser set, interior designer Thomas O’Brien has created a series of lacquered wooden vessels, their lids topped with bulbous knobs, for Copper Beech, his housewares store in Bellport, New York. The collection also includes an attractive modern take on the hand mirror, made in the style of the containers’ covers: a disk fitted with the same orb-like handle. Available in both white and blue, this tool for self-reflection helps add a bit of design history to one’s preening. ($104, copperbeechbythesea.com) —Zoe Dubno

Ride

175 CS Sport


In another time and place, “Disco Volante” (that’s Italian for “flying saucer”) would have been our D.J. handle. But back in 1954, it was the nickname riders bestowed upon the 175 CS Sport, owing to its flared-out fuel tank. Built by MV Agusta, the motorcycle-maker in the hills of Northern Italy that had earned a reputation making stylish and swift “café racers” (and notched more than a few Grand Prix world championships), the bike was produced from 1954 to 1958 and was the house’s top seller. (stuartparrcollection.com) —Michael Hainey

Back to the issue